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Situation in Syria

Pushing ahead with the political process

In view of the Turkish intervention and the appalling humanitarian situation in many places, the German government has called for an end to the violence in Syria. The road to a political solution is through the UN-facilitated Geneva peace process, said federal government spokesperson Steffen Seibert in Berlin.

Ruined buildings following an airstrike on Idlib, Syria on 13 January 2018 Wherever we look in Syria the humanitarian is appalling and in some cases desparate, said Steffen Seibert Photo: picture alliance/abaca

The German government supports the process, he added.

As a NATO ally, and direct neighbour of Syria, Turkey is very immediately affected by the violent conflict in Syria, stressed government spokesperson Steffen Seibert on Monday at the government press conference.

Syria needs the violence to end

The success achieved together in the fight against the so-called IS must not be jeopardised, he said. "That is why what Syria needs now is an end to the violence and moves to stabilise the country," he stated. This demands a political solution, and the road to a solution of this sort is through the UN-brokered process. "We want to do everything to foster and support this process," explained the government spokesperson.

Federal Foreign Office spokesperson Maria Adebahr also stressed that in view of the military confrontation with incalculable risks, the last thing that Syria now needs is more military confrontation. "That is why we have once again called urgently for efforts to move the political process forward," she explained. At the end of the week there will be another chance in this direction in Vienna at the next round of Geneva talks.

Appalling humanitarian situation

Steffen Seibert welcomed the fact that the United Nations Security Council will be looking at the situation in Syria today (22 January 2018). "It is good that it will focus in particular on the humanitarian situation."

The humanitarian situation in Syria is appalling wherever we look, and in some places desperate. This is the case in the region of Idlib, currently home to millions of people who have already fled the destruction of war in and around Aleppo. The war and the acts of violence of the regime in Damascus have followed them.

Equally badly hit is the region of Eastern Goutha near Damascus. It has been besieged for years, cut off from humanitarian aid, and is in a desolate situation.

The United Nations Security Council will also look at Turkey’s actions, said Federal Foreign Office spokesperson Maria Adebahr. The German government is counting on the members of the Security Council to act in line with their responsibility and avoid further heightening the risks of the conflict.

Jan 22, 2018